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Found 34 Items using the search term "insect"

Insect Orders

LucidMobile
Insects make up the vast bulk of species diversity on the planet. Many millions of insect species exist and entomologists have divided them into a manageable number of units called Orders. The members of each insect Order have arisen from a common ancestor, share similar structural characteristics and have certain biological attributes in common.Not all insect Orders are equal in species number; some Orders have just a few hundred species while others have more than 100,000 species. The range of structural characteristics and biological features tends to be broader in the more species-rich Orders.Predictions about the biology, behaviour and ecology of an insect can be made once you know its Order. But how can you know the Order to which an insect belongs? Insects can be identified in various ways. Comparing a specimen with a book of illustrations of identified insects is one way. Using a printed key is another way. This Lucid based key combines the advantages of these methods and adds a new dimension of simplicity and power to the process of identification.This simple identification key is designed to identify most common adult insects to Order in Australia. The key has been designed for use by advanced secondary students, beginning undergraduates and others interested in entomology. We have written the key so that students will learn about the structure and biology of insects while identifying them. We have included three groups of arthropods in this key (Protura, Collembola and Diplura) that are closely related to insects.How can you tell if an insect is an adult and can be identified using this key? That is a simple question without a simple answer. If your insect has fully-developed, functional wings then it is an adult. However, some adult insects have reduced, non-functional wings and others have no wings at all. In these cases the adult forms have fully developed genitalia at the apex of the abdomen.

Citrus Pests Key

LucidMobile
Citrus is one of the most important commercially grown agricultural products in the United States. Additionally, many citrus varieties are backyard crop plants, providing important sources of food at a local community level. As a result, citrus is one of the most economically important groups of plants. Numerous insect pests threaten the citrus industry and backyard citrus trees through feeding damage, while other pests vector diseases that are potentially lethal.Citrus Pests Key is aimed primarily at extension agents, inspectors, and other plant professionals with access to a light microscope and hand lens. It is designed to help users determine which type of citrus insect pest they have encountered by featuring an interactive key coupled with illustrated, descriptive fact sheets for each pest. Citrus Pests Key is intended to be used as a screening aid. For definitive species identification, specimens should be sent to an expert for verification.During the initial development of the key, an advisory committee developed a comprehensive list of over 300 pest and beneficial arthropods that needed to be considered for inclusion into the key. Since the key was designed and scoped as a basic screening aid to support survey and detection support, 51 total species from the comprehensive list were selected by the authors based on the following criteria:- commonly found insect pests on cultivated citrus in the U.S. as determined by the Citrus Pest Advisory Committee,- citrus insect pests that have been intercepted at U.S. ports but have not become established,- insect pests that have entered the U.S. but have now been eradicated, and- exotic insect pests of immediate concern to U.S. cultivated citrus.Key authors: Sarahlynne Guerrero, Jennifer Weeks, Amanda Hodges, Kirk Martin, and Norman LepplaThis key is part of a complete Citrus Pests tool: http://idtools.org/id/citrus/pests/Lucid Mobile key developed by USDA APHIS ITP

Key to Insect Orders on the App Store on iTunes

Identic Pty. Ltd.

Description

Insects make up the vast bulk of species diversity on the planet. Many millions of insect species exist and entomologists have divided them into a manageable number of units called Orders. The members of each insect Order have arisen from a common ancestor, share similar structural characteristics and have certain biological attributes in common.

Not all insect Orders are equal in species number; some Orders have just a few hundred species while others have more than 100,000 species. The range of structural characteristics and biological features tends to be broader in the more species-rich Orders.

Predictions about the biology, behaviour and ecology of an insect can be made once you know its Order. But how can you know the Order to which an insect belongs? Insects can be identified in various ways. Comparing a specimen with a book of illustrations of identified insects is one way. Using a printed key is another way. This Lucid based key combines the advantages of these methods and adds a new dimension of simplicity and power to the process of identification.

This simple identification key is designed to identify most common adult insects to Order in Australia. The key has been designed for use by advanced secondary students, beginning undergraduates and others interested in entomology. We have written the key so that students will learn about the structure and biology of insects while identifying them. We have included three groups of arthropods in this key (Protura, Collembola and Diplura) that are closely related to insects.

How can you tell if an insect is an adult and can be identified using this key? That is a simple question without a simple answer. If your insect has fully-developed, functional wings then it is an adult. However, some adult insects have reduced, non-functional wings and others have no wings at all. In these cases the adult forms have fully developed genitalia at the apex of the abdomen.

mBYF on the App Store on iTunes

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Description

The televised version of Backyard Farmer has been on the air, each April to September, since 1953. The panel provides research-based answers to gardening questions about insect pests, fruits and vegetables, turf and landscape design and much more.

NPIPM Soybean Guide on the App Store on iTunes

South Dakota State University

Description

This guide is intended to provide current effective management options for insect and other arthropod pests affecting soybeans grown in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota and Kansas.

Citrus Pests Key on the App Store on iTunes

United States Department of Agriculture-APHIS

Description

Citrus is one of the most important commercially grown agricultural products in the United States. Additionally, many citrus varieties are backyard crop plants, providing important sources of food at a local community level. As a result, citrus is one of the most economically important groups of plants. Numerous insect pests threaten the citrus industry and backyard citrus trees through feeding damage, while other pests vector diseases that are potentially lethal.

Citrus Pests Key is aimed primarily at extension agents, inspectors, and other plant professionals with access to a light microscope and hand lens. It is designed to help users determine which type of citrus insect pest they have encountered by featuring an interactive key coupled with illustrated, descriptive fact sheets for each pest. Citrus Pests Key is intended to be used as a screening aid. For definitive species identification, specimens should be sent to an expert for verification.

During the initial development of the key, an advisory committee developed a comprehensive list of over 300 pest and beneficial arthropods that needed to be considered for inclusion into the key. Since the key was designed and scoped as a basic screening aid to support survey and detection support, 51 total species from the comprehensive list were selected by the authors based on the following criteria:
- commonly found insect pests on cultivated citrus in the U.S. as determined by the Citrus Pest Advisory Committee,
- citrus insect pests that have been intercepted at U.S. ports but have not become established,
- insect pests that have entered the U.S. but have now been eradicated, and
- exotic insect pests of immediate concern to U.S. cultivated citrus.

Key authors: Sarahlynne Guerrero, Jennifer Weeks, Amanda Hodges, Kirk Martin, and Norman Leppla

This key is part of a complete Citrus Pests tool: http://idtools.org/id/citrus/pests/

Lucid Mobile key developed by USDA APHIS ITP

Forest Insect Pests

Bugwood
Forest Insect Pests in North AmericaThe photos present in this App are intended to help foresters, urban landscaping employees, or others working with trees recognize some of the common pest insects affecting trees in North America and understand their life cycles and how they damage trees. The information was drawn from book, websites, factsheets, and some original literature. This App is not a guide for specialists. In many groups, such as the bark beetles and aphids, confirmation of species identity requires attention to details not visible in photos with comparisons to other similar species and use of keys. Sources for further information (websites and articles) are given at the bottom of each species' page.

agIndex

Monsanto Company
Get all the markets, weather, news and exclusive agronomic advice, in one quick-to-read dashboard. Newest push features agAhead yield trial results. Receive push notifications customized to your location and crop portfolio to keep up with changes in commodity pricing and insect and weather alerts. agIndex turns your smartphone or tablet into a complete agronomic information source, so you can stay fully informed while in the field or on the road. Brought to you by Asgrow®, DEKALB® and Deltapine® seed brands.

NPIPM Guide

SDSU Mobile Apps
This guide is intended to provide current effective management options for insect and other arthropod pests and for plant pathogens affecting all major field crops grown in North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, Iowa and Kansas. Chemical and non-chemical control practices, when available, are described in detail for individual pests and pathogens. These practices include cultural and biological control options, and host plant resistance. By including alternatives to pesticides, we hope to create a ready reference of management strategies growers will consider when faced with a pest problem.

IRM Refuge Calculator

National Corn Growers Association
The IRM refuge calculator is a tool intended to illustrate the appropriate refuge calculation, the quantity of standard seed bags to purchase for both trait and refuge, and possible planting configurations for planting certain corn products in the United States. This refuge calculator does not replace or supplement the applicable manufacturer's IRM Grower Guide in any way. As a grower using this information, you are still obligated to understand and abide by the applicable IRM Grower Guide on planting and Insect Resistance Management.